Robert Eberenz: Grand Spike Cred in Louisville

Originally posted by the National Association of Home Builders at NAHBNow.com.

EberenzphotoThe BIA of Greater Louisville thrives on competition. Especially when it comes to Grand Spike Robert Eberenz and his hefty stash of Spike Credits.

The strong leadership of the Kentucky city’s BIA creates friendly rivalry while helping bolster the association. “[Growing] membership is one of the ways you can have fun with some of the competitiveness with other members of our association,” Eberenz, the owner of Robert L. Eberenz Jr. Builder LLC, says.

Although they have small prizes for the competitions, Eberenz says that is not his biggest motivation. “The incentive is to show leadership and to do what you can for the association,” he said. That, and bragging rights among builders, of course.

Eberenz got his start 35 years ago, when the local association involvement torch was relayed from his father, who was also a builder and a past president. “At an early age, he encouraged me to give to the association,” he said.

With the kids off to college, Eberenz has devoted his time to serving on the Activation and Retention Committee, an integral and unique committee for the BIA. When it comes time for members’ annual dues, committee members reach out to renewing members one by one to talk with them about what the BIA can do to help their business, as well as anything the members may be unhappy about, so it can be fixed. (Earning half a Spike Credit for each renewing member, Eberenz says, has a snowball effect − and Eberenz has 1,076.5 of them.)

One reason to stay active in the BIA is because it focuses on the importance of doing business with BIA members, highlighting this with Associates. “I tell them, not just as a builder am I calling on you, you’re not just selling your services and products to builders, but to all other Associates as well. It’s common knowledge that people want to do business with people they know. And if you’ve got a good business, that’s honest with integrity, you’ll benefit.”

But when you ask Eberenz to describe his method of marketing the association to potential members, he sums it up as not something he is trying to sell, but something he wants to share. “It’s something that I’m proud of and my membership is extremely important. This is something that is good for your business and it’s an association you should want to be involved in.”